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Oregon Historic Sites Database

address:2200 NE 71st Ave historic name:Rose City Golf Clubhouse
Portland, Multnomah County (97213) current/other names:
assoc addresses:
block/lot/tax lot:
location descr: twnshp/rng/sect/qtr sect:1N 2E 29
resource type:Building height (stories):1.5 total elig resources:1 total inelig resources:0
elig evaluation: eligible/significant NR Status:
prim constr date:1931 second date: date indiv listed:10/31/2012
primary orig use: SOCIAL: General orig use comments:
second orig use: RECR/CULTURE: General
primary style: English Cottage prim style comments:
secondary style: sec style comments:
primary siding: Brick:Other/Undefined siding comments:
secondary siding: Shingle
plan type: architect:Angell, Herbert A
builder:B. T. Allyn
comments/notes:
Not associated with any surveys or groupings.
NR date listed: 10/31/2012
ILS survey date:
RLS survey date:
106 Project(s): None
Special Assess Project(s): None
Federal Tax Project(s): None
(Includes expanded description of the building/property, setting, significant landscape features, outbuildings and alterations)
The Rose City Golf Clubhouse, located at 2200 NE 71st Avenue in Portland, was designed by Herbert A. Angell and constructed in 1931 and 1932 in the English Cottage style. The one-and-one-half story building is characterized by steeply pitched, complex gable and hip roofs clad in composition shingle encompassing the top half of the clubhouse. Additional character-defining features include multiple dormers, multi-pane wood windows, and a large brick chimney. A combination of red brick veneer at the ground floor and painted, combed cedar shingles with a 16-inch reveal clad the exterior walls. Each façade has several wood multi-pane casement and fixed windows with molded surrounds within segmental-arched openings finished in vertically-laid bricks. The doors are primarily multi-pane wood, with double doors at the main entrance on the northwest façade. Most of the other entrances are also within segmental-arched openings. The main approach to the building is from the south parking lot. The northeast façade facing the golf course and putting green, however, has the largest and most elaborate façade. The exterior of the clubhouse retains excellent integrity of materials, craftsmanship, and design. The location and setting are virtually unchanged, aside from some landscape alterations associated with the golf course’s development over time. The building was designed as a municipal golf course clubhouse and retains its original function for the City of Portland Parks and Recreation department. Architectural drawings and plans indicate that several renovations have occurred on the interior of the building, but the basic floor plan remains. Some historic features, such as the fireplace, have been covered up through renovations but remain in place behind modern drywall. Proposed rehabilitation plans include restoring and highlighting the significant character-defining features amidst a contemporary interior design that will serve the building’s current and future needs.
(Chronological, descriptive history of the property from its construction through at least the historic period - preferably to the present)
The Rose City Golf Clubhouse, located at 2200 NE 71st Avenue in Portland, Oregon, is significant under “Criterion A,” Entertainment and Recreation, as the second municipal golf course established in Oregon and the oldest surviving example of a municipal golf clubhouse in Portland. The Clubhouse is significant at the local level as a recreational facility that is integral with the sport of golf’s rise in popularity with the general public during the period in which it was developed. The Clubhouse is the physical and social focal point for this golf course. Constructed in 1931 and 1932, the clubhouse was designed by Portland architect Herbert A. Angell and constructed by general contractor B. T. Allyn. It was built as the main facility for the Rose City Golf Course. The course was designed by landscape architect George H. Otten and constructed between 1922 and 1927. The exterior of the clubhouse is in good condition and maintains a high degree of integrity. It has seen few changes since its opening in 1932. The interior has been heavily remodeled over the years. This has resulted in the loss of historic fabric and materials. Several historic features remain, however, and the basic configuration and orientation of the floor plan is in place. The Rose City Golf Clubhouse is significant under Criterion A for its association with recreation in Portland, specifically as the clubhouse for a municipal golf course. Constructed in 1931-1932, the building expresses the efforts of golfers in Northeast Portland to organize the community and municipality to finance a recreational facility in the early years of the Great Depression. The construction of the Rose City Golf Clubhouse occurred at a time when golf became widely popular among middle class patrons in the United States. No longer a game for the elite, the Rose City Golf Clubhouse served as a surrogate home for Portland’s growing middle class. Herbert A. Angell’s clubhouse design reflected national trends in clubhouse architecture, with many architects adopting specific elements for golf clubhouses. These elements, as reflected in the Rose City Golf Clubhouse, included the adoption of revival architectural styles and designs that mirrored residential structures. The Rose City Golf Clubhouse was the second municipal clubhouse constructed in Portland, following the 1922 construction of a clubhouse for the Eastmoreland Golf Course. The Eastmoreland clubhouse was demolished in the 1980s, making the Rose City Golf Clubhouse the oldest surviving municipal golf clubhouse in the city, and the oldest known example of such a facility in Oregon. See National Register Nomination for Developmental History
Title Records Census Records Property Tax Records Local Histories
Sanborn Maps Biographical Sources SHPO Files Interviews
Obituaries Newspapers State Archives Historic Photographs
City Directories Building Permits State Library
Local Library: University Library:
Historical Society: Other Respository:Portland City Archives
Bibliography:
Barkow, Al. The Golden Era of Golf. New York: Thomas Dunne Books, 2000. Cannify, KiKi. The Northwest Golfer: A Guide to Public Courses of Washington and Oregon. Portland: Ki2 Enterprises, 1987. City of Portland. Bureau of Parks and Recreation. Map of Park System. 1956, 1964, 1971. City of Portland. Historic Resources Inventory, City of Portland, Oregon: Identified Properties. Craig, Arthur H. “One Game Caused All This,” in Oregon Golf, (volume and issue unknown), circa 1930, 11-12, 40. Duniway P.T.A. and Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association. Eastmoreland. Portland: The Sellwood Bee, 1977. Eberlein, Harold D. “Country Club Houses.” Architectural Record. 38, no. 2 (1915): 207-8. Embury , Ayman II. “The Small Country Club.” Architectural Forum 42 (Mar. 1925): 176. Frances, C. Edwin. Waverly Country Club 1896-1987. Portland: Waverly Country Club, 1987. Frost, Mark. The Greatest Game Ever Played: Harry Vardon, Francis Ouimet, and the Birth of Modern Golf. New York: Hyperion, 2002. Gottfried, Herbert and Jan Jennings. American Vernacular Buildings and Interiors: 1870-1960. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2009. Gustafson, Alice. The Story of Glendoveer: a History of Glendoveer Golf Course. Portland: A. Gustafson, 2003. Hawkins, William J. III and William F. Willingham. Classic Houses of Portland, Oregon 1850-1950. Portland: Timber Press, 2005. Jones, Robert T., Jr. Golf’s Golden Age. Far Hills, NJ: United States Golf Association, 2005. Keyser, Charles Paul. The Story of the Institution of Public Links Golf in Portland, Oregon. Portland: 1958. Macdonald, Charles Blair. Scotland’s Gift: How America Discovered Golf. Morristown, NJ: Tatra Press LLC, 2003. Moss, Richard J. Golf and the American Country Club. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2001. Myers, Kent C. Golf in Oregon. Portland: Ryder Press, 1981. Peper, George. The Story of Golf. New York: TV Books, 1999. Portland City Archives, Oregon, Clubhouse for Rose City Golf Links, Sept 1931, (6501-5). Portland City Archives, Oregon, Clubhouse on Rose City Golf Links, Sept 1931, (6501-12). Portland City Archives, Oregon, Clubhouse, Rose City Municipal Golf Course, Portland, OR, c. 1945 (A 2001 – 045.95). Portland City Archives, Oregon. Eastmoreland Clubhouse Architectural Drawings, 1987-1989. Portland City Archives, Oregon, Historic File, Rose City Golf Links, 1920-1964, (7290-01). Portland City Archives, Oregon, Parks and Recreation Maps & Plans, Rose City Golf Course Clubhouse, NE 71st Ave and Tillamook St., (M/10927). Portland City Archives, Oregon, Parks and Recreation Maps & Plans, Rose City Golf Course, NE 71st Ave and Tillamook St., (M/10903). Portland City Archives, Oregon, Parks and Recreation Photographs, Rose City Golf Course Clubhouse, c. 1945, (P/22717). Portland Golf Club. Portland Golf Club: A Seventy-Five Year History, 1914-1989. Portland: Portland Golf Club, 1989. Ritz, Richard Ellison. Architects of Oregon. Portland: Lair Hill Publishing, 2002. Roth, Michael S., ed., Rose City Park Neighborhood History Book 1907-2007, 100th Anniversary Edition, Portland: Rose City Park Neighborhood Association, 2008 Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. Portland, Oregon. 1924, vol. 8, p. 0c, 895, 895a; 1950, vol. 8, p. 895 - 895a Shackelford, Geoff. The Golden Age of Golf Design. Chelsea, MI: Sleeping Bear Press, 1999. Shelley, Jeff and Michael Riste. Championships & Friendships: The First 100 Years of the Pacific Northwest Golf Association. Seattle: Pacific Northwest Golf Association, 1999. Strege, John. When War Played Through: Golf During World War II. New York: Gotham Books, 2005. The Oregonian. Portland, Oregon: 1915 - 1990. Wendehack, Clifford C. Golf and Country Clubs: A Survey Requirements of Planning, Construction and Equipment of the Modern Clubhouse. New York: W. Helburn, Inc., 1929. Wind, Herbert Warren. The Story of American Golf, Volume One 1888-1941. New York: Callaway Editions, 2000.