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Oregon Historic Sites Database

address:107 NE 1st St historic name:Enterprise IOOF Hall
Enterprise, Wallowa County (97828) current/other names:Enterprise IOOF Lodge Hall, Oddfellows Hall
assoc addresses:
block/lot/tax lot:3 / pt 3-pt 4 / 1100
location descr: twnshp/rng/sect/qtr sect:2S 44E 2
resource type:Building height (stories):2.0 total elig resources:1 total inelig resources:0
elig evaluation: eligible/significant NR Status: Individually Listed
prim constr date:1920 second date: date indiv listed:03/07/2012
primary orig use: Meeting Hall orig use comments:
second orig use: RECR/CULTURE: General
primary style: Late 19th/20th Amer. Mvmts: Other prim style comments:
secondary style: Commercial (Type) sec style comments:
primary siding: Standard Brick siding comments:
secondary siding: Concrete: Other/Undefined
plan type: Social/Amusement Hall architect:John Oberg
builder:John Oberg
comments/notes:
Survey/Grouping Included In: Type of Grouping Date Listed Date Compiled
   Historic Resources of Downtown Enterprise, 1888-1956 MPD MPS 03/07/2012 2011
   Wallowa-Enterprise RLS 08 Survey & Inventory Project 2008
NR date listed: 03/07/2012
ILS survey date: 08/30/2009
RLS survey date: 06/01/2008
106 Project(s): None
Special Assess Project(s): None
Federal Tax Project(s): None
(Includes expanded description of the building/property, setting, significant landscape features, outbuildings and alterations)
Setting The Enterprise Lodge IOOF Hall is located on the eastern end of the commercial core directly north of the Enterprise City Library. An alley separates the library property from the IOOF Hall. The City Hall/Fire Station and a commercial building are across NE First Street to the west. The sidewalk and parking strip abuts the building on the front (west), an automotive business and parking lot is on the north, and a gravel area is in back (east) of the building. Exterior Completed in 1920, the Enterprise IOOF Lodge No. 153 Hall is a two-story, rectangular building measuring 60’x75’. The building has a barrel-vault roof concealed by stepped front and side parapets. External reinforcement trusses were added to the roof in the 1960s. A tall brick chimney extends from the center of the roof. The brick exterior is laid in a common bond pattern with the exception of the decorative brickwork on the top of the two outside bays of the front (west) facade, and the IOOF identity sign. The darker, contrasting clinker bricks on the outside two bays are laid in alternating patterns that project above the surface of the smooth coursing. This decorative brickwork extends around to the first bay of the south facade. In the center of these bricks are rectangular panels of smooth common bond. The top of the wide central bay on the front façade has the letters “IOOF” highlighted in light-colored brick. The front facade is divided into three bays separated by raised pilasters that extend above the top of the parapet. Paired, six-over-one, double-hung wood sash windows are between each pilaster. The daylight basement level and foundation are made of board-form concrete; the elevated basement gives the appearance of a three-story building. The basement windows are recessed in the concrete foundation and are void of decorative detailing. The upper windows have a concrete lintel above the openings. The third row of upper windows are not as tall as the basement and first floor windows. Scored concrete, simulating stone, surrounds the main entrance door on the southern end of the west (front) facade. A flat arch caps the top of the double wood entrance doors made of two elongated glass panels in the upper portion and squat recessed panels on the lower portion. Originally, the entrance doors had multi-lights in the upper portion and two horizontal panels in the lower portion. The north side facade, made of board-formed concrete, has a stepped parapet and is void of any openings (historically, another building adjoined this façade; currently a metal carport is attached to this façade but it is not part of this building). The south (rear) facade is constructed of board form concrete with grouped, six-over-one, double-hung wood sash windows on the upper level and six-light wood windows in the daylight basement. A metal building is attached to the northeast corner of the building (neighboring business). The south side facade, visible from the adjacent Carnegie Library, is more decorative than the north side. The facade is finished with brick on the upper two stories above the concrete basement level. Raised brick pilasters extend above the parapet height and separate the five bays on this façade. Paired six-over-one, double-hung wood sash windows are between the raised pilasters at the level of the second story; a single, paired double-hung window is at the upper west corner, a feature reflecting the front facade, and a six-light and replacement window are on the lower basement windows. Over the years, the grade on the south side of the property has been raised necessitating the removal of the original double doors on this facade. The lower half of the existing windows have been filled in with concrete. The exterior of the building has remained virtually unaltered since its completion in 1920. Interior Basement: Stairs in the entrance foyer lead down to a long, east-west hallway that accesses the kitchen, smaller work rooms, bathrooms, and the large, 50’x60’ dining room that is used as a thrift store currently. The dining room has a concrete floor and walls, and windows on the east sides. Some of the original large wood dining tables are still in the dining hall. Another room, south of the dining hall, has the furnace that heats the building. Stairs in the southeast corner of this utility room lead up to the east side alley. Many features of the kitchen remain unchanged. The beaded board cabinets are still intact and the original cook stove. A pass through window is located on the east wall and opens to the dining hall. Upper Level: A wide, varnished wood staircase, lined with simple square balusters and newel post, is on the east side of the entrance foyer. The stairway leads up to the lodge rooms. An original coat closet is at the top of the stairs on the west wall just outside a small anteroom immediately west of the large lodge hall. A door to the anteroom has a bell to allow lodge members to announce their arrival before entering. The anteroom has the originally varnish woodwork around the windows and doors. All the original hardware is intact including a brass “peephole” on the door opening to the lodge hall. Lodge members were only allowed to enter the hall after they were identified through the peephole. The main meeting hall is a large open room with windows and a slightly elevated stage along the east wall. The floors are varnished wood and the walls are plaster except part of the south wall that is made of folding recessed wood panel doors that fold up and open into a small meeting room along the south wall of the upper level. A drop ceiling was installed in the 1950s-60s; some of the original metal ceiling panels are intact under the drop ceiling. The upper part of the west wall is comprised of a series of wood panels that are hinged at the top and open, exposing a balcony. The balcony was never completed but has risers along the west wall. Citizens could view events in the lodge hall from the balcony. Double doors on the west wall open into a storage area for the lodge. The lodge's smaller meeting room on the south side of the upper story is a long, narrow room with the hinged panel, fold-up doors on part of the north wall. The building also contains original furniture such as altars and chairs that were used by the Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs during their meetings. These rooms were critical components to the society’s rituals. The steps and walls to the attic are unfinished. Major Alterations The building is virtually intact. Alterations include the installation of the drop ceiling in the main lodge hall (approximately 5 feet-some of the original metal ceiling is intact). Other alterations include replacing the original wood boiler and steam radiators with an oil furnace with a shuttered heating system with grates in floor (late 1980s); upgrading the electrical system, rebuilding the back stairway to the alley and replacement of some of the windows on the south side (alley) in 2007. The roof was reinforced with external trusses about 1960. Summation The Enterprise IOOF Lodge is an excellent example of an early 1900s lodge hall constructed for the sole purpose of housing the lodge activities. The building is virtually intact on the interior and exterior, and is significant for its social history and architecturally as an excellent example its type.
(Chronological, descriptive history of the property from its construction through at least the historic period - preferably to the present)
Independent Order of Odd Fellows Building Independent Order of Odd Fellows (IOOF) originated in England in the late 1700s, and was established in the United States in Baltimore, Maryland on April 26, 1819. John Widley started the organization in the United States and coined the motto’s phrase, “Visit the Sick, Relieve the Distressed, Bury the Dead, and Educate the Orphan.” The first lodge in Oregon was established in Salem in 1852; the Enterprise Lodge followed almost 50 years later. The Enterprise IOOF Lodge No. 153 was instituted on April 12, 1901, having been organized under the dispensation granted April 4, 1901. The May 24th charter lists the first members as H.C. Mahaffey, J.W. Rankin, J.W. Kerns, T.D. Scott, H.E. Endicott, J.S. Cook and John Root. After seeking a more permanent home for the lodge activities, the IOOF joined forces with the Knights of Pythias in 1907, and formed a group called the Enterprise Fraternal Association for the purpose of building a lodge hall. By 1908, the lodges and private citizens financed the construction of a new Bowlby stone building on the southwest corner of Main and Second streets (200 W. Main). Known as the Enterprise Fraternal Association Building, the first floor was rented to a variety of businesses while the upper floor served as the lodge meeting hall. The dedication ceremony for the hall was held on February 28, 1908. The building served the needs of the lodge, and the community for many years until the Fraternal Building Association sold the building to the Enterprise State Bank but maintained a lease (until the end of 1917) to the upper floor until new locations could be found for the lodges' meetings and events. The IOOF started making plans for a their own lodge hall. The January 1, 1917, Chieftain headlines state “LODGES MAY BUILD THEIR OWN HOMES.” The IOOF had previously purchased a lot on Third and Main streets. For some years, lodge members talked about building a substantial lodge similar to the City’s Carnegie Library with a half basement for dining and social events while the upper floor would be reserved for lodge activities; the building would be for lodge use only. The Knights of Pythias also planned to build a similarly independent lodge, but renting the ground floor to help generate income to maintain the lodge. Plans for a new lodge were facilitated when prominent resident Sarepta Weaver, widow of William Weaver, donated a city lot next to the City Library for the purpose of building a new lodge. The property was given to the lodge for a dollar on August 11, 1917 (Wallowa County Deed Book 29, p. 485). Construction was slowed by the lack of funds for the project and the impending war in Europe. Two years later, plans for the new IOOF began again in earnest. The lodge announced the completion of the plans for the new IOO building in the May 22, 1919 edition of the Chieftain. Local contractor John Oberg, a Swedish emigrant of 1907 born in May 1882, designed the building that was described as having “an attractive appearance, with a front giving the impression of three stories in height. It is to rise on the lodge lot, across the alley to the north of the Carnegie Library.” Plans specified a 60’x75’, two-story brick building, with a basement that included a large dining room and kitchen. The upper floor was designed for use as a meeting hall. Construction began in the summer of 1919 and continued into the fall. The brick used in the construction was locally manufactured. By December 11, 1919, the IOOF was nearing completion, and warm weather in January 1920 allowed work to continue. On April 1, 1920, the newspaper announced the date for the dedication ceremony, which was scheduled for April 25th. The new lodge hall was the first of its kind in Wallowa County to be completed for exclusive use by the lodge (no commercial spaces). The article in the paper continues with a glowing report of the new building, “The building is 60 feet wide and 74 feet deep. In the half basement of the ground floor has a great dining hall 50 feet by 60 feet, with a large kitchen adjoining. There is a commodious parlor for the especial conveniences of women. These rooms on the ground floor give a keen sense of the suppers and pleasant social gatherings which will be held there in the future years by the Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs, and their families. The second floor is primarily devoted to the lodge hall proper, which occupies most the space. Along the west front runs a balcony, under which are the anteroom and the property room and lavatories. At the south of the lodge hall, and connected with it by large sliding doors, is a pleasant room facing the south, which is used for club purposes. On ordinary occasions, this will be shut off from the lodge hall.” The building was dedicated in the spring; hundreds gathered to see the newest addition to the town. Although membership in the Enterprise IOOF Lodge has diminished over the years (currently about 20 members), the Lodge still retains ownership of the building and uses the structure for community events and lodge meeting. The basement is rented to the Soroptimists Thrift Shop for their store. built from locally produced bricks in 1910. The upstairs ceiling has been lowered but otherwise it is virturally unchanged.
Title Records Census Records Property Tax Records Local Histories
Sanborn Maps Biographical Sources SHPO Files Interviews
Obituaries Newspapers State Archives Historic Photographs
City Directories Building Permits State Library
Local Library:Enterprise Public Library University Library:Wallowa Co. Historical Museum
Historical Society: Other Respository:
Bibliography:
References Belew, Ellie. “About Wallowa County: People. Places, Images.” Enterprise, OR: Pika Press. 2000. “Building on Our Pioneer Spirit.” Wallowa County Economic Action Team Report. May 2007. Coffman, Lloyd W. “5200 Thursdays in the Wallowas, A Centennial History of The Wallowa County Chieftain.” Enterprise, OR: Wallowa County Chieftain, 1984. Donovan, Sally. National Register Nomination. "The IOOF/Paris Fair Building." March 1990. Enterprise City Plat Map, Wallowa County Assessor’s Office, Wallowa County Courthouse. “History of Union and Wallowa Counties.” Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902. Justice, George. Personal interview by Sally Donovan and Bruce Howard. Long-time Enterprise resident, July 2009. Oregon Trail Press. Oregon Death Index. Pudgett, Keith. “The History of Wallowa County, OR.” Wallowa County Museum Board. Dallas TX: Taylor Publishing Company. 1983. Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, Enterprise, OR: 1890, 1900, 1910, 1917, and 1941. Sterbentz, Cathy. “Historic Downtown Enterprise, A Walking Tour.” Enterprise Hometown Improvement Group. Enterprise, OR 2006. Swinehart, Ralph. Enterprise IOOF Lodge member, site tour and written information, July 2009. United States Census, 1880, 1900, 1910, 1920, and 1930. “Wallowa County Chieftain.” 1/18/1917, 1/14/1909, 5/22/1919, 12/11/1919, 1/1/1920, 4/1/1920. 5/26/1927, 9/15/1945, and 3/28/1946. “Wallowa County Chieftain.” "Wallowa County 1887-1987, 100 Years of Pioneer Spirit." February, 1987. “Walla Walla, Union-Bulletin.” 16 September 1945. “Wallowa County, A Land of Beauty and Opportunity.” Enterprise Chamber of Commerce publication, ca. 1960. Wallowa County Courthouse. Assessor’s and Clerk’s Office. Enterprise, OR. World War I Draft Registration. Enterprise, OR.