Oregon Historic Sites Database

Search Menu

Site Information small logo

Oregon Historic Sites Database

address:310 NW Broadway historic name:Sengstake Building
Portland, Multnomah County current/other names:Everett Hotel
assoc addresses:
block/lot/tax lot:
location descr: twnshp/rng/sect/qtr sect:1N 1E 34
resource type:Building height (stories):3.0 total elig resources:1 total inelig resources:0
elig evaluation: eligible/significant NR Status: Individually Listed
prim constr date:1914 second date: date indiv listed:10/31/2012
primary orig use: Hotel orig use comments:
second orig use: Road Related (vehicular)
primary style: Tudor Revival prim style comments:
secondary style: sec style comments:
primary siding: Brick:Other/Undefined siding comments:
secondary siding: Cast Stone
plan type: 2-Part Block architect:Foulkes & Hogue
builder:Foulkes & Hogue
comments/notes:
Not associated with any surveys or groupings.
NR date listed: 10/31/2012
ILS survey date:
RLS survey date:
Special Assessment
Status Term End Yr
Active 1st Term  2022
106 Project(s): None
Federal Tax Project(s): None
(Includes expanded description of the building/property, setting, significant landscape features, outbuildings and alterations)
The Sengstake Building is located at 310 NW Broadway in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. It is approximately nine blocks due north of Portland’s downtown retail core. The immediate area is urban, with buildings generally of similar age, scale, massing, materials, and uses. The building is located on a 4,000-square-foot parcel at the northeast corner of Broadway and Everett Street. The parcel is flat and the building is built to the lot lines with no character-defining landscape features. The structure is three-stories with full basement, generally of unreinforced-masonry construction. In form, the Sengstake is rectangular, 100-feet along the north-south axis of Broadway and 40-feet along the east-west axis of Everett. The street façades are red-brick in stretcher bond with deeply raked joints of gray-mortar; the secondary façades are party walls. Fenestration divides the street façades into eight bays on the west and three bays on the south. Windows are consistent with double-hung, wood-sashes in wood-frame with one-over-one lights on the second floor and five-over-one lights on the third floor. These façades are divided by a sheet-metal belt-course between the first and second floors, and capped by a pronounced classically-detailed sheet-metal cornice. The result is a superlative example of the two-part commercial block, as defined by Richard Longstreth’s The Buildings of Main Street. What particularly distinguishes the building is its elaborate and sophisticated use of cast-stone trim, generally in the Tudor Revival style. These light gray elements contrast dramatically against the red brick façade. The most striking decorative elements are the bas-relief spandrel panels between the second and third floors. These feature a cartouche flanked by botanical decoration. This spandrel then is flanked by a cast-stone frame that runs from the first/second floor belt-course to the cornice and topped by a Tudor arch. To tie the multiple window bays with the façade frame, the corners then feature slight cast-stone Corinthian-style columns with cable-molded body and botanical capitals. These columns rise from a simple cast-stone base that runs across the first/second floor belt-course and supports a second similarly simply defined double cast-stone band just below the cornice. This band consists of a thin rectangular cast-stone panel above each window bay. This panel has a bas-relief of a central shield over a ribbon flanked by floral decoration. The exterior on the upper floors is intact. The ground floor has leased retail spaces all of which open west onto Broadway. As designed and constructed in 1914, the wood pilasters divided this level into five bays on the west and two bays on the south. This bay structure did not align with that of the upper floors. In 1917, the ground floor was consolidated into a single automobile showroom. It remained a single commercial space until the late 1930s, at which time it was divided into its present form with two primary commercial tenants. Despite the changes in the number of commercial leases, the storefronts themselves consistently reflected the original arrangement of five bays on the west and two on the south. The design is traditional with tile bulkheads supporting plate-glass windows topped by a multi-light wood-framed transom. Detailing is classical and, despite the changes over time, many original elements are retained: These elements include the wood pilasters, wood-framed transoms and the pedimented entry. The bulkheads have been changed, although the bulkheads in the three north bays feature the black and yellow tile of the building’s automobile showroom era from 1917. On the interior, the ground floor reflects its history as leased space with substantial changes over time. Today, the north storefront has an open floor plan divided only by exposed columns. The south storefront currently houses a restaurant with modern finishes. The second and third floors were built for hotel use and are nearly identical with a double-loaded “L”-shaped corridor leading to individual guest rooms. Finishes on the upper floors are typical of the use and era with plaster walls and ceilings, wood floors, and painted wood trim that includes baseboard, chair and picture rail, door surrounds with transoms, and window surrounds. The upper floors on the interior are also largely intact
(Chronological, descriptive history of the property from its construction through at least the historic period - preferably to the present)
The 1914 Sengstake Building, designed by the noted architectural firm of Foulkes & Hogue, is located just north of downtown Portland. It is significant locally and eligible for the National Register under Criterion C in the category of Architecture as a superior and essentially intact example of the Commercial style of architecture. More specifically, it is an exceptional expression of the “two-part commercial block” building defined by Richard Longstreth in his The Buildings of Main Street. As Longstreth details, the “two-part commercial block” was a common Main Street composition: Buildings between two and four floors divided by design into two distinct zones that conformed to the interior uses. This description accurately portrays the three-story Sengstake Building which has a ground-floor retail zone and a two-story hotel zone. Almost by definition, the designs of two-part commercial structures were largely driven by economics and generally were utilitarian and simple. In contrast to this trend, the architects of Sengstake Building produced an unusually elaborate, distinctive, and memorable design that may be characterized as Tudor Revival. In this way, the Sengstake Building stands as a demonstration of the potential of the two-part commercial block design.
Title Records Census Records Property Tax Records Local Histories
Sanborn Maps Biographical Sources SHPO Files Interviews
Obituaries Newspapers State Archives Historic Photographs
City Directories Building Permits State Library
Local Library:Multnomah County Library University Library:
Historical Society:Oregon Historical Society Other Respository:
Bibliography:
Abbott, Carl. Portland. Planning, Politics and Growth in a Twentieth Century City. Lincoln: University of Nebraska, 1983. City of Portland Office of Planning & Development Review microform and card files. Ferriday, Virginia Guest, ed. Historic Resources Inventory of Portland. Portland, OR: City of Portland, 1984. Jackle, John and Keith A, Sculle. America’s Main Street Hotels. Knoxville, TN: The University of Tennessee Press, 2009. Longstreth, Richard. The Buildings of Main Street: A Guide to American Commercial Architecture. Washington, D.C.: Preservation Press, 1987. MacColl, E. Kimbark. Merchants, Money & Power. Portland: Georgian Press, 1988. _____. The Growth of a City. Portland: Georgian Press, 1979. _____. The Shaping of the City. Portland: Georgian Press, 1976. Oregon Journal (1913-1915) Oregonian (1913-present) Polk’s Portland, Oregon City Directory. Portland, OR: Polks. Ritz, Richard E., FAIA. Architects of Oregon. Portland, OR: Lair Hill Publishing, 2002. Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for Portland, Oregon