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Oregon Historic Sites Database

address:24670 S Hwy 99E historic name:Barlow, William, House
Barlow, Clackamas County (97013) current/other names:Barlow, William & Martha Ann, House
assoc addresses:
block/lot/tax lot:N/A / N/A / 00901
location descr:Canby, Aurora twnshp/rng/sect/qtr sect:4S 1E 5 C
resource type:Building height (stories):2.0 total elig resources:5 total inelig resources:
elig evaluation: eligible/significant NR Status: Individually Listed
prim constr date:1885 second date: date indiv listed:02/15/1977
primary orig use: Single Dwelling orig use comments:
second orig use:
primary style: Italianate prim style comments:
secondary style: sec style comments:
primary siding: Horizontal Board siding comments:Wide drop siding w/cornerboards and watertable
secondary siding: Synthetic Siding: Other/Undefined
plan type: Central Passage architect:
builder:Kidd
comments/notes:
Extensive archival and photo collections of the Wm. Barlow House, the Barlow family and Virginia Miller are housed at the Clackamas County Historical Society, Museum of the Oregon Territory. Ms. Miller placed an Historic Preservation League of Oregon "Preservation Easement" on the façade and property in 2003.
Survey/Grouping Included In: Type of Grouping Date Listed Date Compiled
   Clackamas County Historic Landmarks Survey & Inventory Project 2008
NR date listed: 02/15/1977
ILS survey date: 09/30/2007
RLS survey date: 04/30/1984
Special Assessment
Status Term End Yr
Expired 1st Term  1991
106 Project(s): None
Federal Tax Project(s): None
(Includes expanded description of the building/property, setting, significant landscape features, outbuildings and alterations)
ROOF FORM AND MATERIALS: Truncated hip roof PRIMARY WINDOW TYPE: One-over-one double-hung sash w/ architrave molding; some with round-headed surrounds; some with entablature heads DECORATIVE FEATURES: Chamfered posts; eave brackets; turned balustrade; jigsawn brackets; paneled frieze OTHER: Single-bay porch w/ flat roof supported by posts w/ balustrade, n. elev.; enclosed single-bay porch w/ shed roof, s. elev.; single-bay porch w/ hip, e. elev.; double paneled door; two-story polygonal window bays, s. and w. elevs.; two-story truncated hip roof ell, s. elev.; three interior chimneys; staircase w/ turned balustrade and large ornate newel posts, n. elev. ALTERATIONS; Porch altered, n. elev. The Barlow House has had few exterior alterations since the historic period. The original front porch was removed by the second owners and an encircling porch was added. The encircling porch was removed and the original porch was restored by the fourth owner, Virginia Miller (c. 1990). The Barlow House is an example of the Italianate style of architecture. Composed of two rectangular volumes, the house was built in 1885. Architectural evidence supports this date of construction. The Italianate style was popular during the 1860s through the 1880s. The buildings were generally formal and symmetrical with hipped roofs, wide projecting cornices with brackets, and sash windows often with arched and curved window tops. Small entry porches were most common and were usually restrained in decoration and of single-story height. In keeping with the style, the Barlow house contains all of these elements and other decorative features such as the chamfered posts, the turned balustrade, jigsawn brackets and a paneled frieze. Wash House/Coal Shed: ESTIMATED DATE BUILT: c. 1860 STYLE: Vernacular PLAN/TYPE/SHAPE: Rectangular NO. OF STORIES: 2 FOUNDATION MATERIAL: Post-and-beam ROOF FORM AND MATERIALS: Gable w/ composition shingles WALL CONSTRUCTION/STRUCTURAL FRAME: Wood/stud PRIMARY WINDOW TYPE: Six-over-six double-hung sash; multi-light fixed EXTERIOR SURFACING MATERIALS: Wide drop siding w/ cornerboards and rake boards; double-bevel siding; sheet metal DECORATIVE FEATURES: Pointed-arch window in gable peak OTHER: Paneled door; shed roof ell w/ overhead sliding door, w. elev.; shed roof ell, e. elev. EXTERIOR ALTERATIONS (DATE): Ell added, e. elev. (after 1906) Carriage House: ESTIMATED DATE BUILT: c. 1930 STYLE: Vernacular PLAN/TYPE/SHAPE: Rectangular NO. OF STORIES: 1 FOUNDATION MATERIAL: Concrete blocks at corners ROOF FORM AND MATERIALS: Gable w/ wood shingles WALL CONSTRUCTION/STRUCTURAL FRAME: Wood/stud PRIMARY WINDOW TYPE: Pointed-arch window, n. elev. EXTERIOR SURFACING MATERIALS: Narrow drop siding w/ cornerboards and rake boards OTHER: Paired, hinged doors EXTERIOR ALTERATIONS (DATE): Doors replaced (n.d.); doorway covered, n. elev. (n.d.) Wellhouse: ESTIMATED DATE BUILT: c. 1905 STYLE: Vernacular PLAN/TYPE/SHAPE: Rectangular NO. OF STORIES: 1 FOUNDATION MATERIAL: Cast stone ROOF FORM AND MATERIALS: Gable w/ composition shingles WALL CONSTRUCTION/STRUCTURAL FRAME: Masonry/unknown PRIMARY WINDOW TYPE: Hinged EXTERIOR SURFACING MATERIALS: Cast stone; narrow drop siding in gable peak OTHER: Vertical board hinged door EXTERIOR ALTERATIONS (DATE): Wood siding removed from gable peak, s. elev. (n.d.) LANDSCAPE: Ornamental plantings; mature deciduous trees. The two rows of black walnut trees, planted in 1859, extend from the house to the highway. The rows were shortened due to the construction of the railroad and the highway, however, they remain a prominent feature and add to the character of the historic buildings. The black walnuts were brought around the Horn for Wm. Barlow. He started hundreds of seedlings which were planted in the two rows at this site; the remaining seedllings were sold around the region and most old black walnut trees are attributed to Wm. Barlow's seedlings. The Barlow House is located on the south side of Highway 99E, a busy and noisy, four-lane thoroughfare and the Southern Pacific Railroad. The house is set back from the road. The side is level with two rows of black walnut trees leading to the house and ornamental plantings surrounding the house. Across the road, to the north, are railroad tracks and commercial buildings. On the east there is a field and a commercial building. On the west and south there are fields. The area is a mixture of commercial and agricultural uses. The house is located just outside the Barlow city limits and the Samuel Barlow Donation Land Claim.
(Chronological, descriptive history of the property from its construction through at least the historic period - preferably to the present)
SUBJECT PROPERTY According to county records, William Barlow and his wife, the original owners, sold the property in 1896 to Mary S. Barlow. Mary Barlow sold the property in 1905 to S.B. Berg and his wife. The Bergs sold the property to the County in 1919, but are recorded as the sellers in 1927, when the property was sold to George S. Berg and others. The property remained in the Berg family ownership until 1956, when it was sold by Bernard J. and Emma Berg to Charles Page. Virginia Miller purchased the house and 1.53 acres (without the adjacent barns) from the Pages in 1973 and spent the next 30 years restoring the home to it's original condition. Ms. Miller placed an Historic Preservation League of Oregon "Preservation Easement" on the façade and property in 2003 and sold the property to Jeffrey and Amy Falconer in 2004. Virginia Miller died of breast cancer in December 2004. According to the National Register Nomination form: "In 1850, Sam Barlow purchased the land on which the present house is located from Thomas McKay, a former employee of the Hudson's Bay Company. There was probably a house on the property when Barlow purchased the land, and part of the 1,450 acres was cultivated. "William Barlow first settled on a farm on the Clackamas River near Oregon City. In his memoirs, William referred to Oregon Trail travelers stopping at his farm, so it must have been either on or near the actual route of the trail. He sold this Clackamas River farm in 1848 to an Oregon Trail traveler and engaged in several enterprises in the Oregon City area. Sometime during the 1850s, William bought his father's farm. Sam Barlow moved from his farm to Canemah, near Oregon City, where he died in 1867. "Under William Barlow, the farm developed into a small community. In 1859, William planted the first black walnut trees in Oregon. They were planted in two rows from the house to the main road through Barlow, about 300 yards from the house. In 1870, the railroad was built through the Willamette Valley and the route went through the Barlow property. A station was built and named for William Barlow. Barlow and his brother-in-law, Hodges, built and financed one of the first river steamboats on the upper Willamette River - the Canemah. On his farm and in the community of Barlow, William Barlow started a sawmill, a grist mill, the first post office, and the Barlow Bank and Land Development Company. "The William Barlow House was constructed in 1885 soon after the first Barlow house burned (probably in 1883). The new house was constructed on the same site as the original house, maintaining the same orientation to the outbuildings. It is not know whether Barlow hired an architect to prepare the plans for his house, but the evidence suggests he did not. The records do, however, show that Barlow hired Mr. Kidd, master carpenter, to supervise the construction of his house. Some of the construction materials for the house were no doubt prepared in Barlow's sawmill." The Barlow House is an example of the Italianate style of architecture. Composed of two rectangular volumes, the house was built in 1885. Architectural evidence supports this date of construction. The Italianate style was popular during the 1860s through the 1880s. The buildings were generally formal and symmetrical with hipped roofs, wide projecting cornices with brackets, and sash windows often with arched and curved window tops. Small entry porches were most common and were usually restrained in decoration and of single-story height. In keeping with the style, the Barlow house contains all of these elements and other decorative features such as the chamfered posts, the turned balustrade, jigsawn brackets and a paneled frieze. The Barlow House has had few exterior alterations since the historic period. The original front porch was removed by the second owners and an encircling porch was added. The encircling porch was removed and the original porch was restored by the fourth owner, Virginia Miller. In addition to the house, there are three outbuildings which are believed to date from the historic period. The wash house/coal shed is a two-story building clad with wide drop siding with cornerboards and rake boards with the wash room on the first floor, the coal shed attached to the back and the upstairs was used for drying clothes. The carriage house is a one-story building clad with narrow drop siding with cornerboards and rake boards, and the well house is a small one-story rectangular building clad with cast stone. There is one other building on the property, a shed, which is believed to post-date the historic period. Originally, there was a circular drive and fountain in front of the house, two barns, a carriage house, an orchard, a smokehouse, a large machine shed, a chicken house, a four-bedroom tenant house, hog sheds, and a sawmill on the property. The tenant house was used as living quarters for the Barlow's negro servants, Rosa and John. It was later used as a granary when it was moved to the fields after 1906 and burned down circa 1982. The sawmill was located on the original donation land claim on the back part of the property near the Molalla River. The two rows of black walnut trees, planted in 1859, extend from the house to the highway. The rows were shortened due to the construction of the railroad and the highway, however, they remain a prominent feature and add to the character of the historic buildings. The Barlow House is significant as an example of the Italianate style and for its association with William Barlow. The property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The house is additionally significant as a singular example of an Italianate style dwelling, dating from the Progressive Era (1884-1913), listed on the Clackamas County Cultural Resource Inventory for the Canby/Barlow study area.
Title Records Census Records Property Tax Records Local Histories
Sanborn Maps Biographical Sources SHPO Files Interviews
Obituaries Newspapers State Archives Historic Photographs
City Directories Building Permits State Library
Local Library: University Library:
Historical Society:Clackamas County Historical Society Other Respository:
Bibliography:
Clackamas County Cultural Resource Inventory, 1984. Clackamas County Tax Assessor records, Oregon City, OR. Miller, Virginia. Unrecorded interview w/ Patricia Elliot, 1 June 1992. "Oregon Journal", 16 February 1982, p. 6ms. Sutton, Robert K., National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form, September 1976. TICOR Title Company, Oregon City, OR.