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Oregon Historic Sites Database

address:59 SW Wilbur St historic name:Rogers, George, House
Lake Oswego, Clackamas County (97034) current/other names:
assoc addresses:
block/lot/tax lot:3 / 1,2, & 3 / 4700
location descr: twnshp/rng/sect/qtr sect:2S 1E 10 AD
resource type:Building height (stories):2.0 total elig resources:4 total inelig resources:0
elig evaluation: eligible/significant NR Status: Individually Listed
prim constr date:1929 second date: date indiv listed:10/03/1996
primary orig use: Single Dwelling orig use comments:
second orig use:
primary style: Neo-Spanish/Mediterranean prim style comments:
secondary style: Arts & Crafts sec style comments:
primary siding: Stone:Other/Undefined siding comments:
secondary siding: Stone:Other/Undefined
plan type: architect:Bailey, James Van Evera
builder:
comments/notes:
Historic Preservation League of Oregon Easment on Property. Based on the Lake Oswego ILS 2016 survey, the George Rogers House is Neo-Spanish/Mediterranean in style with brick and stone as its primary and secondary materials.
Survey/Grouping Included In: Type of Grouping Date Listed Date Compiled
   Lake Oswego ILS 2016 Survey & Inventory Project 2016
NR date listed: 10/03/1996
ILS survey date: 11/05/2015
RLS survey date:
Special Assessment
Status Term End Yr
Removed by Owner 1st Term  1998
106 Project(s): None
Federal Tax Project(s): None
(Includes expanded description of the building/property, setting, significant landscape features, outbuildings and alterations)
This infromation is based on the 2016 Lake Oswego ILS: The George Rogers House is located at the northwest corner of Wilbur and Durham Streets on a .35- acre, rectangle-shaped parcel in the Old Town neighborhood of Lake Oswego. The site is flat and features a short uncoursed stone wall along its perimeters. Other landscape features include multiple mature trees, such as a Japanese maple, pine, and magnolia trees to the west and southeast of the site. Italian cypress trees, bushes, ferns, and other ornate vegetation surround the house. Semi Evergreen hedges are located along the rock wall opening and stone and brick driveway to the west. The site also features a brick patio in the backyard, and a stone and brick path along the south, west, and north façades. The brick path, driveway, and stone retaining wall are constructed out of salvaged materials from the first and second iron furnaces in Oswego, such as branded firebrick, stone, and slag. The George Rogers House faces south towards Wilbur Street. It is a two-story, T-shaped form with a cross-gabled roof. The house consists of two units: the primary two-story, front-gabled unit to the west and a centrally located one-story, side-gabled unit to the east. A two-story, side-gabled breezeway with sunroom wing is centrally located on the west façade. An additional one-story, front-gabled chapel wing is located to the northeast on the north façade of the primary unit. Collectively, the house sits atop a poured-in-place concrete foundation with recessed window openings on the south façade. The north, east, south, and west façades are faced with buff-colored polychrome brick in a running bond pattern and uncoursed quarry-faced stone, and feature a variety of wood windows with wood and stone casing. Stone and brick cladding were salvaged from the first and second iron furnaces in Oswego. Window styles include paired, one-over-one double-hung and single-light wood windows, and multiple grouped single-light wood windows with wood lintels and brick or stone sills. Other widow styles include fixed stained-glass arched windows, recessed fixed single-light wood windows with stone voussoirs, a large wood picture window with stone sill, and a lancet window with brick lintel and sill. The main entrance is located on the south façade and consists of a single-door opening with solid wood door and outer metal storm door under a cantilevered gabled awning. Below the door and awing is a stone stoop with steps. The gables protrude from the house with exposed rafters. The roof is finished with red clay tiles with aluminum gutters. A brick chimney projects from the north slope of the primary unit and a stone chimney is located on the gable wall of the secondary unit to the east. An attached one-story, front-gabled single-bay garage is located to the west of the house off of the two-story breezeway wing. Like the house, the garage is faced with brick and stone, and has an overhanging roof with exposed rafters. Paired one-over-one windows with wood lintels and brick sills are located on the north and west façades. The roof is finished with red clay tiles and aluminum gutters. The site also includes a half basketball court on a slab-on-grade foundation to the southwest of the garage. Since the last survey was recorded in 1989, the George Rogers House has experienced little to no alterations. Outside of the replacement of the main entrance storm door and the addition of the vegetation around the house nothing else looks to have been altered. It is suspected that the roof was replaced with made-to-order red clay tile in the early 2000s. The basketball court addition was added overtime. The date of this addition is unknown. The George Rogers House has many of the features used to define Mediterranean Style houses that were common from 1890-1955. These features include widely overhanging opened eaves, red tile roof covering, and asymmetrical forms. The George Rogers House also features an eclectic array of window styles, and cladding that does not correspond directly with the Mediterranean Style; however its most notable features are typical of Mediterranean Style houses.
(Chronological, descriptive history of the property from its construction through at least the historic period - preferably to the present)
This infromation is based on the 2016 Lake Oswego ILS: The George Rogers House is located at 59 Wilbur Street in Lake Oswego, Oregon. Originally built in 1929 in the Old Town neighborhood, this house has retained excellent integrity and has become a prime example of Mediterranean style dwellings that were common throughout the United States from 1890-1955. In addition to its architectural distinction, it is also associated with George Rogers who is known for his contribution to Oswego through his grocery store enterprise. For these reason, the George Rogers House is significant under Criterion C for its architecture and Criterion B for its association with the lives of persons significant in Oswego’s past. The Rogers House sits on land originally owned by Albert Alonzo Durham as part of his 640-acre Donation Land Claim. After having arriving in Oregon in 1847, Albert and Miranda Durham platted a town site and named it Oswego three years later in 1850 (McArthur 273). Early development of Oswego revolved around the Old Town neighborhood, where the Durhams built their home. In 1855, the Durhams started to sell their 640-acre Donation Land Claim for the sum of $20,900 (Lake Oswego Preservation Society “1850 Oswego”). Those who purchased this land were the Missionary Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church and John Corse Trullinger who filed the official plat of Oswego and named the streets to honor the iron industry investors in 1867” (Lake Oswego Preservation Society “1850 Oswego”). Around this time and after the construction of the Oregon Iron Company furnace, this neighborhood began to resemble a company town, complete with hotels, boarding houses, and homes. Years later, “the Oswego Iron Company incorporated to produce pig iron in 1878. The Oswego Iron Company underwent further reorganization and changed ownership in 1882 and became known as the Oregon Iron & Steel Company. By 1894 production of pig iron ceased and the company began to change its business from iron production to development of the 24,000 acres it owned in and around Oswego Lake, known at that time Sucker Lake” (Passchier 4). By 1888 the population of this neighborhood shifted to others such as Oswego’s third neighborhood, First Addition. George Rogers was “born in the City of Camanario on Madeira Island, Portugal in 1888 and emigrated to the United States in the early 1900s. He arrived in the United States via South American landing in New York City. He subsequently continued traveling up to Boston where he obtained training as a cook and worked at Wellesley College form 1908-1909. In 1911 he moved to Oregon and opened a restaurant in the St. Johns neighborhood of Portland which remained in business for a very short time. He then obtained employment at the Glenmmorie farm located near Lake Oswego and was owned by Fred Morey” (Grimala 18). Years later after marrying Lottie Smoke in 1914, “George and Lottie Rogers purchased a farm in Sherwood where they lived until 1915 and then moved back to the Glenmorrie farm for a short time before moving to Wilbur Street, Oswego” where he “eventually purchased a modest cottage located at 59 Wilbur Street, Oswego and opened a grocery store in Oswego, Oregon in 1923. Lottie Rogers stated in an oral interview completed in 1977 that ‘Mr. Rogers had a lot of vision and had he had a little more we could have had half of Oswego at that time’” (Grimala 19). The cottage “served as their residence until 1929 when they moved into their new house designed by Van Evera Bailey and located on the same lot ” (Grimala 19). George Rogers paid $9,000 for the house and lived in it until his death in 1961. According to Lottie Rogers, “our house on Wilber Street is built from brick from the second old furnace, or whatever was down by the cement plant before it was torn down. And Mr. Rogers also was in the stone business and picked up all the rocks around Oswego, sold them in different places. That’s what our house is built of. The bottom part of stone and the upper story is brick form the old furnace (Lake Oswego Public Library 208). “The Rogers family chose to open their store during a particularly robust economic period for Oswego, Oregon. Much of this prosperity can [be] traced to Paul Murphy prominent Portland developer and capitalist.” Their grocery store was “located at the corner of State Street and B Avenue in Oswego, Oregon. It proved to be so successful that less than two years later they were able to purchase a corner block and build a new store at 402 North State Street, Oswego, Oregon. Rogers chose the northwest comer of A Street and State Street for his commercial building which was well within the emerging downtown business district of Oswego, Oregon” (Grimala 19). Today, the house continues to reflect many of the character-defining features associated with Mediterranean style dwellings common during its time of construction. These features include widely overhanging opened eaves, red tile roof covering, and asymmetrical forms. Currently, the George Rogers House retains excellent historic integrity, as it continues to embody many of the Mediterranean style characteristics used during its time of construction, making it a prime example of its style and type. The design of Lakewood School is attributed to the work of Van Evera Bailey. Born in La Grande, Oregon in 1903, this native of Oregon is considered one of the leaders in developing the Northwest Regional Style. Prior to become a trendsetting architect, Bailey was a draftsman in Portland, Oregon where he first worked on the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company building in 1923. Later that year, Bailey began a pattern of working for multiple architects such as Otis J. Fitch, N. Torbitt in 1925, Wayland & Fennell in 1926, and John Maloney in 1927. After years of working for different architects throughout the Pacific Northwest, taking time to travel, and moving abroad, Bailey finally obtained his architects license in 1932. Once a certified architect, Bailey continued to find himself working for others, while at the same time crafting his own style, which is expressed in his collaborative work with Richard Neutra on the Jan De Graaf House in 1940. In the late 1940s and 50s, Bailey started to define his style even further with others such as Pietro Belluschi and John Yeon, who are also noted for their contributions to the Northwest Regional Style. After years of designing houses throughout the greater Portland area and receiving national attention, James Van Evera Bailey died in 1980, at the age of 77. Notable works by Bailey include the Jon De Graaf House, the David Erye House, and the L.H. Hoffman House (Ritz 18-20). Additionally, Bailey is known for his contribution to the Northwest Regional Style through innovative design techniques such as laminated roofs, large plate-glass windows, stilt-type construction (Svenson), and sliding glass doors in wood frames (Ritz 19). Overall, the George Rogers House is significant in the areas of architecture and community planning/commerce. Based upon its retention of its historic integrity it has been listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1996 making it eligible as a contributing resource in a historic district.
Title Records Census Records Property Tax Records Local Histories
Sanborn Maps Biographical Sources SHPO Files Interviews
Obituaries Newspapers State Archives Historic Photographs
City Directories Building Permits State Library
Local Library: University Library:
Historical Society: Other Respository:
Bibliography:
This biliography is from the 2016 Lake Oswego ILS: Grimala, Barbara. George Rogers House, National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, 1996. Lake Oswego Public Library. In Their Own Words: A Collection of Reminiscences of Early Oswego, Oregon. Lake Oswego: Lake Oswego Public Library, 2010. Lake Oswego Preservation Society. “Neighborhood Histories: 1850 Oswego.” http://lakeoswegopreservationsociety.org/nh-1850-oswego/. McArthur, Lewis L. Oregon Geographic Names. Portland: Oregon Historical Society Press, 1992. Passchier, Gregoor A. Oregon Inventory of Historic Properties, Historic Recourse Survey Form: Headrick-Carothers House. City of Lake Oswego, 2008. Rritz, Richard. Architects of Oregon: A Biographical Dictionary of Architects Deceased – 19th and 20th Centuries. Portland: Lair Hill. 2003. Svenson, Hope. Van Evera Bailey (1903-1980). Http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/bailey_van_evera_1903_1980_/#.VjP4y7ldGUk.